Turkey Point Bird Count (2021)

Maryland Biodiversity Project is pleased to announce Maryland's first fall morning flight count


Each year, millions of birds migrate through the eastern United States between breeding grounds in North America and wintering grounds in Central and South America. Bird populations may be affected by environmental changes at any point along their migration. To further document bird populations, Maryland Biodiversity Project is pleased to announce the Turkey Point Bird Count to monitor fall migration along the Chesapeake Bay.

Turkey Point is the southernmost point of the Elk Neck Peninsula in Cecil County, Maryland, and a natural gathering point for southbound migrating birds. The Turkey Point Bird Count will document fall bird migration here from August 1st through November 15th.

If you would like to support this effort, please donate via the link above. Monitor updates via Trektellen and eBird (links above) as well as MBP on social media.

View Turkey Point blog feed for updates or visit the Special Projects' Blog website to read more!

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Meet the Counter

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◆ Daniel Irons

Native to Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Daniel grew up birding Queen Anne’s County. Joining the Youth Maryland Ornithological Society at age 8 opened the door to another world of birding and he never looked back. Counting waterbirds over Eastern Bay and passerines moving over his family’s farm along the shoreline sparked an early interest in migration. Annual trips to Cape May furthered his love for migration and over the last few years he’s worked for Cape May Bird Observatory on several migration counts.

Conducting an official migration count in Maryland has been a longtime dream and he’s excited to be working with Maryland Biodiversity Project on the first year of the Turkey Point Bird Count.

Read observations by Daniel Irons on MBP Special Projects' new blog page.

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