Porcelain Berry Ampelopsis glandulosa (Wallich) MomiyamaNon-native  -  Invasive    Synonyms: Ampelopsis brevipedunculata, Ampelopsis glandulosa brevipedunculata, Amur Peppervine.
Kingdom Plantae   >   Division Tracheophyta   >   Class Magnoliopsida   >   Order Vitales   >   Family Vitaceae   >   Genus Ampelopsis   

Status:

Originating in Asia, Porcelain Berry vine is related to our grapevines, which are all native. Porcelain Berry has become an invasive threat in many eastern states, including Maryland. It can grow in most soils, and is especially common in open, exposed habitats, such as disturbed sites, edges of forests and ponds, along stream banks, in thickets, and in waste places. It is not found in permanently wet areas and does not thrive in the heavy shade of mature forest interiors. Porcelain Berry climbs over shrubs and small trees, sometimes killing them by blocking sunlight (Swearingen, et al., 2010).

Description:

Porcelain Berry is a deciduous, woody, perennial that can be confused with our native grapes (See U.S. Department of the Interior, National Capital Region Network, Native Grapes Resource Brief). Porcelain Berry climbs by non-adhesive tendrils at the base of each leaf, and has brightly colored berries of various colors, ranging from pale pink to dark blue and purplish red.

Relationships:

Birds love the fruits and spread the seeds widely.

There are 164 records in the project database.

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Porcelain Berry in Baltimore City, Maryland (10/7/2018). Photo by Kirsten Johnson. (MBP list)

Amur Peppervine fruiting in Queen Annes Co., Maryland (10/25/2014). Photo by Jim Brighton. (MBP list)

Amur Peppervine, more commonly known as Porcelain Berry, in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (9/10/2009). Photo by Kerry Wixted. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Prince George's Co., Maryland (9/25/2016). Photo by Bill Hubick. (MBP list)

Amur Peppervine growing in Howard Co., Maryland (9/3/2015). Photo by Jim Wilkinson. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Montgomery Co., Maryland (10/2/2020). (c) Katja Schulz, some rights reserved (CC BY). Photo by Katja Schulz via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Montgomery Co., Maryland (10/2/2020). (c) Katja Schulz, some rights reserved (CC BY). Photo by Katja Schulz via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry growing in Baltimore Co., Maryland (10/9/2016). Photo by Matthew Beziat. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (8/31/2017). Photo by Bill Harms. (MBP list)

Amur Peppervine in Prince George's Co., Maryland (8/6/2014). Photo by Regina Kreger. (MBP list)

Amur Peppervine in Prince George's Co., Maryland (7/16/2014). Photo by Jesse Christopherson. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry growing in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (6/18/2011). Photo by Bill Harms. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Howard Co., Maryland (7/17/2010). Photo by Bill Harms. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (8/16/2016). Photo by Mac Plant. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Baltimore Co., Maryland (5/24/2019). Photo by Edwin Guevara. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry, in fruit, in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/2/2016). Photo by Jane Hill. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Baltimore Co., Maryland (7/2/2019). (c) Charlie Davis, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by Charlie Davis. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Caroline Co., Maryland (9/28/2020). (c) Wayne Longbottom, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by Wayne Longbottom. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Baltimore Co., Maryland (7/2/2019). (c) Charlie Davis, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by Charlie Davis. (MBP list)

Porcelain Berry in Prince George's Co., Maryland (10/26/2020). (c) mstromberg, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by mstromberg via iNaturalist. (MBP list)


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