Brush-tipped Emerald Somatochlora walshii (Scudder, 1866)S1 (Highly state rare)  

Status:

Brush-tipped Emerald (Somatochlora walshii) is a widespread northern species, found only at higher elevations in the southern extremes of its range. It is named for the distinctive hairy cerci of the male. Maryland is near the known southern limit of its range. This small species inhabits streams flowing through sedge meadows or marshes (Paulson, 2011). In Maryland, it has been found only in Garrett County, and apparently from just two sites (Richard Orr's The Dragonflies and Damselflies of Maryland and the District of Columbia). It is ranked S1 (highly state rare) due to the restricted nature of its range, and vulnerability to climate change.

There are 2 records in the project database.

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A Brush-tipped Emerald in Garrett Co., Maryland (7/20/2008). Discovered for the first time in Maryland by Richard Orr on 6/25/2008. Highly state rare (S1). Photo by Steve Collins. (MBP list)

A close-up of the terminal appendage of a male Brush-tipped Emerald found at 1000 Acre Heath, Maine (7/4/2010). Photo by Jim Brighton. (MBP list)


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