Dragonhunter Hagenius brevistylus Selys, 1854  Synonyms: Black Clubtail, Black Dragon.
Kingdom Animalia   >   Phylum Arthropoda   >   Class Insecta   >   Order Odonata   >   Family Gomphidae   >   Genus Hagenius   

Status:

Dragonhunter (Hagenius brevistylus) is the largest gomphid in North America. Its large size, long legs, proportionately small head, and scarcely-developed club are very distinctive if seen well. This aggressive and fearless species feeds largely on other odonates, plus other large insects like butterflies (Paulson, 2011). It occurs across Maryland at creeks and rivers, but is generally regarded as uncommon (Richard Orr's The Dragonflies and Damselflies of Maryland and the District of Columbia).

There are 327 records in the project database.

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A Dragonhunter in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (6/23/2007). Photo by Bill Hubick. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter in Washington Co., Maryland (7/5/2016). Photo by Derek Hudgins. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter in Howard Co., Maryland (6/25/2013). Photo by Richard Orr. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter in Howard Co., Maryland (7/2/2010). Photo by Russ Ruffing. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter in Caroline Co., Maryland (6/24/2018). Photo by Jim Brighton. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter at rest in Howard Co., Maryland (9/5/2013). Photo by Richard Orr. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter in Montgomery Co., Maryland (6/19/2016). Photo by Ashley Bradford. (MBP list)

A newly emerged Dragonhunter in Allegany Co., Maryland (5/27/2012). Photo by Bonnie Ott. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter emerging from its exuvia in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (6/10/2012). Photo by Judy Gallagher. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter exuvia in Caroline Co., Maryland (7/15/2018). Verified by Richard Orr. Photo by Bill Hubick. (MBP list)

A Dragonhunter nymph in Howard Co., Maryland (4/26/2013). Photo by Robert Aguilar, SERC. (MBP list)


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