Eastern Tiger Salamander Ambystoma tigrinum (Green, 1825)Endangered (MD)  -  S2 (State rare)  -  Vulnerable  -  Coastal Plain only  

Status:

Eastern Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) is the largest species of mole salamander. It has declined severely in much of its range due to development and habitat loss. They breed in late winter or very early spring, usually in fishless coastal plain ponds (Conant & Collins, 1998; Maryland DNR site). Eastern Tiger Salamanders are currently found only on the eastern shore. On the western shore there were historic populations in Anne Arundel and Charles County. The Charles County population was located near La Plata but it was destroyed to make a golf course in 1963. Currently the only counties with breeding populations of Eastern Tiger Salamanders are Kent and Caroline. This species is considered state endangered in Maryland, with a rank of S2 (state rare).

There are 33 records in the project database.

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An Eastern Tiger Salamander in Maryland (2/10/2018). Photo by Justin Lee. (MBP list)

An Eastern Tiger Salamander in Maryland (3/14/2015). Photo by Mike Burchett. (MBP list)

An Eastern Tiger Salamander in Maryland (3/14/2015). Photo by Mike Burchett. (MBP list)

An Eastern Tiger Salamander in Cape May Co., New Jersey (1/3/2009). Eastern Tiger Salamanders breed during the winter and have been observed migrating over ice to get to their breeding grounds. Photo by Steve Collins. (MBP list)

An Eastern Tiger Salamander in Cape May Co., New Jersey (1/3/2009) Photo by Steve Collins. (MBP list)

Eastern Tiger Salamander larva in Baker Co., Georgia (4/11/2010). Photo by Corey Raimond. (MBP list)

Eastern Tiger Salamander egg mass in Sussex Co., Delaware (12/28/2008). Photo by Steve Collins. (MBP list)


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