Abortive Entoloma Entoloma abortivum Berkeley & M.A. Curtis  Synonyms: Clitopilus abortivus, Rhodophyllus abortivum, Rhodophyllus abortivus.

Status:

Found scattered or in clusters on ground near rotting wood in mixed woods (J. Solem, pers. comm.). "Aborted fruiting bodies actually result from the growth of Armillaria (honey mushroom) attacking the fruiting bodies of the Entoloma. However, some recent studies now suggest that it is the Entoloma which attacks the fruiting bodies of the honey mushroom. Nevertheless, In all my years of finding this mushroom, I have never observed the honey mushroom fruiting among the aborted bodies. Sam Ristich, my mycological guru, was able to grow-out both myceliums from a single aborted body on agar plates." (L. Biechele, pers. comm.)

Description:

Cap: Pale gray/gray-brown, convex with low umbo, inrolled edge. Gills: grayish (pinkish in age), close, subdecurrent. Stalk: Whitish/gray, base usually enlarged and coated with white mycelium. Aborted fruiting bodies: White with pink streaks, usually in clusters; flesh spongy. (J. Solem, pers. comm.)

There are 35 records in the project database.

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Abortive Entoloma (mass of aborted fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (10/2/2009). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Abortive Entoloma (individual fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (10/2/2009). Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Abortive Entoloma on dead hardwood log in Wicomico Co., Maryland (10/2/2014). Photo by Lance Biechele. (MBP list)

Abortive Entoloma (gills) in Howard Co., Maryland (10/2/2009). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Abortive Entoloma in Howard Co., Maryland (10/20/2018). Determined by Jo and Bob Solem. Photo by Sue Muller. (MBP list)

Abortive Entoloma in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/19/2017). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)


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