Bleeding Mycena Mycena haematopus (Poersoon) P. Kummer  

Status:

Usually clustered on decaying wood.

Description:

Cap: Reddish-brown then fading (frosted appearance when young), conic to broadly conic, striate with light scalloped or torn margin. Gills: White to gray. Stalk: Mostly red-brown, covered with short soft, white hairs when young; coarse hairs at base.

All parts exude a dark red latex when bruised or cut, hence the common name. (J. Solem, pers. comm.)

There are 35 records in the project database.

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Bleeding Mycena (young fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (9/13/2009). Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

A Bleeding Mycena (gills oozing red latex) in Howard Co., Maryland (10/28/2010). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Bleeding Mycena on decaying hardwood in Wicomico Co., Maryland (10/2/2014). Photo by Lance Biechele. (MBP list)

Bleeding Mycena (gills and stalks) in Howard Co., Maryland (8/27/2014). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Bleeding Mycena in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/15/2017). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Bleeding Mycena in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/15/2017). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Bleeding Mycena growing in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/11/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Bleeding Mycena specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (8/27/2014). Elliptical, smooth, hyaline; measured 7.5-9.7 X 5.2-6.5 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)


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