Rooted Collybia Hymenopellis furfuracea (Peck) R. H. Petersen  Synonyms: Xerula furfuracea.

Status:

Found solitary or in groups on ground in mixed forests; infrequently on decayed hardwood logs.

Description:

Cap: Light brown to gray-brown with darker margin; dry, slippery; finely velvety; convex to nearly flat with rubbery cuticle, usually wrinkled around distinct umbo. Gills: White, subdistant. Stalk: White beneath brownish scales/fibers; usually tapers upward; often twisted; hollow; above ground portion of stalk may be 20 cm or more while the underground root-like portion may be of similar length. Several similar-appearing species (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

There are 10 records in the project database.

GAALWAFRCLMO HO BABCHACEPG AACVCHSMKEQACNTADOWI SOWO
Rooted Collybia growing in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/6/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Rooted Collybia in Prince George's Co., Maryland (10/4/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

A Rooted Collybia cap in Howard Co., Maryland (5/20/2017). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Rooted Collybia (gills) in Howard Co., Maryland (10/18/2011). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Rooted Collybia (fruiting body) in Howard Co., Maryland (8/12/2009). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Rooted Collybia (fruiting body showing long "root") in Howard Co., Maryland (10/18/2011). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

A Rooted Collybia in Wicomico Co., Maryland (10/3/2013). The long, radiating "root" extends up to 12 cm in the soil. Photo by Lance Biechele. (MBP list)

Rooted Collybia spores collected in Howard Co., Maryland (5/20/2017). Broadly ellipsoid/fusiform, smooth; measured 15.6-17.7 X 10.0-11.7 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Rooted Collybia specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (8/12/2009). Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)


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