Ringless Honey Mushroom Armillaria tabescens (Scopoli) Emel  

Status:

Found in clusters on hardwood trees and stumps, especially oaks.

Description:

Cap: Orangish-brown with dark cottony fibers, dry; convex to broadly convex with broad umbo, flat to depressed in age; veil remnants on margin; strong pleasant odor. Gills: White (pinkish-brown in age); subdecurrent, close. Stalk: White at top, yellow to brownish-gray below; scurfy/fibrous (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

Relationships:

Affiliated with hardwoods, especially oaks.

There are 27 records in the project database.

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Ringless Honey Mushroom growing in Prince George's Co., Maryland (8/20/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Ringless Honey Mushroom in Howard Co., Maryland (8/14/2018). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Ringless Honey Mushroom (young fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (8/1/2010). Photo by Richard Orr. (MBP list)

Ringless Honey Mushroom in Howard Co., Maryland (9/12/2010). Shown here caps covered with white spores dropped from overlapping caps. Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Ringless Honey Mushroom (old fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (7/26/2010). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Ringless Honey Mushroom specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (7/26/2010). Elliptical, smooth; measured 8.2-8.4 X 4.5-5.0 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Spores of Ringless Honey Mushroom in Howard Co., Maryland (8/14/2018). Elliptical, smooth; measured 7.4-8.5 x 4.6-5.3 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)


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