Gilled Bolete Phylloporus rhodoxanthus (Schweinitz) Bresadola  

Status:

Found solitary or in small groups on ground in hardwood (especially oak) or coniferous forests. Also occurs in mowed grass at forest edges.

Description:

Cap: dull reddish-brown to olive-brown, dry, somewhat velvety, cracks may expose yellow flesh; convex to flax or shallowly depressed in age. Fertile surface: gill-like structures deep yellow to olivaceous-yellow, bruise blue, decurrent, separable from cap, often wrinkled with cross-veining. Stalk: dull yellow to reddish-brown, nearly smooth, bruises yellow; yellow mycelium at base (J. Solem, pers. comm.).

There are 87 records in the project database.

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Gilled Bolete in Harford Co., Maryland (8/5/2018). Photo by Dave Webb. (MBP list)

A Gilled Bolete in Howard Co., Maryland (8/13/2008). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Gilled Bolete (gill-like structures) in Howard Co., Maryland (8/13/2008). Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

A Gilled Bolete growing in Prince George's Co., Maryland (8/7/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

A Gilled Bolete growing in Howard Co., Maryland (8/19/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Sue Muller. (MBP list)

A Gilled Bolete growing in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland (6/28/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Gilled Bolete specimen found in Howard Co., Maryland (9/1/2011). Fusiform, smooth; measured 9.0-10.8 X 4.4-4.8 microns. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)


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