Black Jelly Oyster Resupinatus sp. Gray  

Status:

Usually found in groups; mostly on lower portions or bottoms of fallen hardwood branches or on logs, less often on conifers.

Description:

Tiny fruiting body: Kidney to shell-shaped, dry, flesh thin; varying degree of hairiness; ranging in color from light tan-brown through gray to black. Gills: Moderately distant to distant, dark with or without white edges. Stalk: None to small pseudo-stalk; laterally attached to substrate.

Note: Using macro characteristics to attempt to identify a species in this genus is challenging and often results in a "best guess." Cap color, density and location of hairs, presence or absence of a pseudo-stalk, and waviness of the margin frequently overlap among species and may vary by age and wear, as well as by species. The two species most commonly found in field guides are R. alboniger and R. applicatus. Generally the spores of the former are somewhat elongate and may be sausage-shaped, while the latter’s spores are closer to round. There are numerous species in this genus so more than spore examination may be necessary to distinguish species.

There are 16 records in the project database.

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Black Jelly Oyster in Baltimore Co., Maryland (1/23/2020). Photo by Emilio Concari. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster growing in Howard Co., Maryland (1/11/2020). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Sue Muller. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/18/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster in Howard Co., Maryland (8/12/2015). Determined by Jo and Bob Solem. Photo by Richard Orr. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (group of fruiting bodies) in Howard Co., Maryland (10/2/2016). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster in Montgomery Co., Maryland (9/18/2018). Determined by Jo Solem. Photo by Anne Looker. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (gills) in Howard Co., Maryland (7/24/2019). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (gills) in Howard Co., Maryland (6/6/2015). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (fruiting bodies, dorsal) in Howard Co., Maryland (5/29/2009). Photo by Wesley Earp. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (infertile surface) in Howard Co., Maryland (6/20/2014). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (fertile surface) in Howard Co., Maryland (6/20/2014). Photo by Joanne Solem. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster (gills) in Howard Co., Maryland (5/29/2009). Photo by Wesley Earp. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster in Worcester Co., Maryland (1/17/2014). Photo by Lance Biechele. (MBP list)

Black Jelly Oyster in Montgomery Co., Maryland (6/18/2020). (c) wearethechampignons, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC). Photo by wearethechampignons via iNaturalist. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Black Jelly Oyster specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (6/6/2015). Oval, smooth, hyaline; measured 5.3-5.9 x 3.4-3.9 microns. Spore size and shape consistent with R. alboniger. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Black Jelly Oyster specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (10/2/2016). Oval, smooth, hyaline; measured 5.0-6.0 x 3.0-3.56 microns. Spore size and shape is consistent with R. alboniger. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Black Jelly Oyster specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (7/24/2019). Oval, smooth, hyaline; measured 4.0-4.7 x 1.7-2.1 microns. Spore size and shape is consistent with R. alboniger. Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)

Spores collected from a Black Jelly Oyster specimen in Howard Co., Maryland (6/20/2014). Photo by Robert Solem. (MBP list)


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